chingizhobbes:


In this portrait, Prokudin-Gorksii captures the traditional dress, jewelry, and hairstyle of an Uzbek woman standing on a richly decorated carpet at the entrance to a yurt, a portable tent used for housing by the nomadic peoples of Central Asia. After conquering Turkestan in the mid 1800s, the Russian government exerted strong pressure on the nomadic peoples to adopt a sedentary lifestyle and settle permanently in villages, towns, and cities.

Russian Turkestan, c.1907-1915. At this point, it is likely that the term “Uzbek” referred to the descendants of the actual nomadic Uzbeks who had become the ruling class of the Central Asian khanates and emirates in the 16th century. This is in contrast to the settled “sarts,” who did not live in yurts and whose nomadic heritage had given way to settled life many centuries earlier in the case of both Turkic and Iranian sarts.

chingizhobbes:

In this portrait, Prokudin-Gorksii captures the traditional dress, jewelry, and hairstyle of an Uzbek woman standing on a richly decorated carpet at the entrance to a yurt, a portable tent used for housing by the nomadic peoples of Central Asia. After conquering Turkestan in the mid 1800s, the Russian government exerted strong pressure on the nomadic peoples to adopt a sedentary lifestyle and settle permanently in villages, towns, and cities.

Russian Turkestan, c.1907-1915. At this point, it is likely that the term “Uzbek” referred to the descendants of the actual nomadic Uzbeks who had become the ruling class of the Central Asian khanates and emirates in the 16th century. This is in contrast to the settled “sarts,” who did not live in yurts and whose nomadic heritage had given way to settled life many centuries earlier in the case of both Turkic and Iranian sarts.

(Source: loc.gov, via everythingcentralasia)

@3 days ago with 42 notes

everythingcentralasia:

Kiz Kuumai (Qiz kuu in Kazakh) translated from Turkic languages ​​meaning “catch the girl”, is a traditional sport among Kyrgyz and Kazakhs. In the old times, this game was part of the wedding ritual.
A game is usually conducted as follows. A young man on horseback waits at a given place (the starting line). A young woman, also mounted, starts her horse galloping from a given distance (usually 12-15 meters ahead) behind the young man. When the young woman passes the young man, he may start his horse galloping. The two race towards a finish line some distance ahead. If the rider catches the girl, he gets right to hug and kiss her which constitutes his victory.
However, if the young man has not caught up to the young woman by the time they reach the finish line, the young woman turns around and chases the young man back to the starting line. If she is in range of the young man, she may use her whip to beat him, which signifies a victory for her.


x x x x
@1 week ago with 31 notes

Animal Crossing: New Leaf Otoyomegatari Clothes

Pixiv contributor Milk (牛乳) has drawn Animal Crossing: New Leaf clothes for Amira, Talas and Layla/Leyli!


She has does a marvelous job, so it would be nice if you left a note on Pixiv or on her twitter if you do use one of her designs!

@4 weeks ago with 37 notes
#otoyomegatari #a bride's story #kaoru mori #mori kaoru #animal crossing #animal crossing: new leaf #new leaf #amira halgal #talas #layla #leyli #layli and leyli 

http://www.mangareader.net/otoyomegatari/36

New girl! New place! haven’t even read it yet, so excite.

@1 month ago with 7 notes
#otoyomegatari #a bride's story #kaoru mori #mori kaoru 
suzani:

GRANDMOTHER’S SCHOOL. The lessons of embroidery. Samarkand region, 2007. Uzbekistan. Photographer by Anatoly Zuev.

suzani:

GRANDMOTHER’S SCHOOL. The lessons of embroidery. Samarkand region, 2007. Uzbekistan. Photographer by Anatoly Zuev.

(Source: pinterest.com, via dokhtare-samarqandi)

@1 month ago with 175 notes

cassie-oliveira18 asked: Hi,My name is Cassandra and I am a portuguese student, majoring in Asian Studies. I would like to know where I can get an MA related with Central Asia. I also LOVE Central Asia, I love everything about it, but I dont know where to start.

polyglotted:

chingizhobbes:

For you and anyone else interested in Central Asia for grad school, my first two recommendations are Indiana University (where I went) and University of Washington. Indiana is, imo, the premier destination for all things Central Asia, especially the Uzbek language, but it’s relatively history focused. The nice thing about IU is that they focus purely on Central Asia as opposed to grouping it in with Russian studies. UW is another great program with more focus on modern/political science type aspects of Central Asia, but I have heard there are some issues in department leadership that have taken a negative toll on the program as a whole. IU is much, much cheaper, both in terms of tuition and cost of living and Bloomington is basically the perfect college town.

There are some other options. There are nascent/growing programs with Central Asia classes in a lot universities in different parts of the country, including UT-Austin, University of Michigan, University of Wisconsin, Harvard, NYU, and George Washington, and plenty of others. The best thing you can do is, when looking at various schools, check out departments that may be related to Central Asia (this is usually Russian/Eastern European Studies or Middle/Near Eastern Studies) and see what classes they regularly offer related to the region.

One fantastic development for undergrads is that IU will soon be offering an undergrad degree in Central Eurasian Studies, as well.

Anyway, if there is anyone who’d like to add to this or correct it or suggest some opportunities available in Europe, that might be helpful.

I agree with chingizhobbes on their recommendation of IU and UW (although I believe IU to be the stronger of the two). After spending a year in an MA at Harvard and trying to find my Central Asian group… I’d like to offer some insight on it.

If you’re interested in Northern Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan mostly) then Harvard will work out well. There is a Central Asia working group within the Davis Central (Russian and Eurasian studies) and they people there are good and they do good work. If you’re interested in more of Inner Asia and the Altai (Mongolia, Xinjiang, Tibet, etc) then Harvard is also pretty good. We have a program on Inner Asia and Altaic Studies. Most of the people are historians (and not linguists like me) but it’s still good.

However, if you’re interested in more of Southern Central Asia (Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Afghanistan) then Harvard doesn’t really have you there… There are a few individuals (mostly students) who are forging their own ways in these fields, but there isn’t a great representation for it.

As far as languages (and even regular coursework) are concerned, we consistently offer Persian, Uzbek, Turkish, and Russian. The students that I have met who have learned Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Uyghur, etc… they’ve all learned it on there own.

For old and ancient Central Asian languages, there is an professor emeritus who sometimes teaches private lessons in Chagatai, and a professor may be offering Sogdian next year. However, other languages come and go with various professors and students. There was an ancient Iranian linguist who knew Khotanese Saka and Bactrian, but he is retiring and I don’t know of anyone else who offers these languages. There is a professor in the linguistics department who does Tocharian, but I believe she is on leave right now.

In general, Harvard isn’t a bad place but there is definitely better. There are also some programs in Europe (mostly France and Germany, maybe Leiden). A few French schools like INALCO, Paris III, and others in their consortium (CNRS, INALCO, EPHE, Sorbonne Nouvelle) have a lot on general “Oriental” studies with foci in Turkish Central Asian and Indo-Iranian studies where you can do a lot with Central Asia.

Anyways, I hope this addition can help somehow in the search. Good luck!

I’ve been looking into IU, it looks to have a very good program.

@1 month ago with 21 notes
#meta 

flintandpyrite:

Suzani- Orange Mihrab (Silk embroidery on cotton, with wool backing, Uzbekistan, circa ~1890-1910)

While many suzani are intended as bedcovers, this one is small and narrow enough that it makes me wonder if it is meant to be a wallhanging. The small size combined with the unidirectional mihrab pattern that recalls the shape of the niche in the wall of a mosque that faces Mecca point toward this being a wallhanging. The backing seems too modern to be original, as the colors of the silk floss have faded considerably in comparison to the bright print of the backing. This suzani’s style is not unique, but it is unusual and very striking.

Suzani Project 2/7

The technique used here is called basma couching. It allows for quick embroidery and was frequently used for commercial pieces.

(via dokhtare-samarqandi)

@1 month ago with 14 notes
#uzbek #suzani #basma #embroidery 

201 followers!! Eek! You guys are so great!

@1 month ago with 3 notes
#blog 

Traditional costume of a Turkmen bride.

In Turkmen culture, bride’s dress differs from casual dress not only with quality, but, first of all, with the symbolism. Its function has a close link with magic, in particular it serves as an item of protection and purification. Special days, considered as lucky days for Muslims, were chosen for wedding dress cutting-out and sewing. Bride’s prosperity depended on it. Dress was cut out and sewed in the bride’s house from the material got in the groom’s house. Because of these all close friends gathered in her house. Respected in the village woman who had a lot of children cut out this dress starting with blessings. Scarps of the material were taken for happiness by those attended the cut-out procedure.

Bride’s wedding dress is always distinguished by wealthy embroidery and decorations. Pendants sewed in the front from both sides of dress in several rows have great importance. Because of this attire dress becomes festive and melodious chime of silvery scaly pendants suppresses evil spirits. By the may, pendants in Turkmen culture have always been served not only as decoration items, but they have symbolic meaning fulfilling the duties of protectors and amulets. It was considered that the bride summoned evil spirits. That is why she should always be protected by all accessible means. In order not to allow evil spirits to see her face and also to hide her face and figure, bride was totally covered with cape. A lot of actions, amulets and talismans were used to protect the bride. Wickers, laces from camel’s hair, tooth of a swine, silver plates in the necklaces from beads with eyes were sewed into all wedding dresses. «Dagdan» made from wood and a triangle knap-sack with coal and salt were sewed to the connective plate between the false sleeves of ritual cape-robe.

x x x x x

(Source: everythingcentralasia)

@6 days ago with 55 notes

universalbeauty:

 Karkalpak people


Karkalpaks are a turkic speaking ethnic group located in southern Uzbekistan near the Aral sea. The area they live in is known as Karkalpakstan.

@1 week ago with 338 notes
#karakalpak #qaraqalpaq #photographs 

Speculation Theater - Anis

Introducing a new type of post! Sometimes, like with Talas’ bridal garb, I am able to find an exact match. Sometimes, not so much! In this case, for Anis, we only have one chapter of information to go on, so theories may be contradicted or confirmed as the story progresses. Anyhow, here goes.

Hypothesis 1 - Anis is a Persian living in Persia

1 - Persia is on the way

We know that Mr Smith is travelling from the coast of the Aral Sea to Ankara, Turkey. Persia during the Qajar dynasty included territory south and southwest of the Aral Sea, and Mr Smith would have to travel through it to get to Ankara.

2 - Persian garb

Though her clothes are not an exact match for the previously posted image, it is possible that Ms Kaoru Mori took artistic liberties, making it more form-fitting to emphasize Anis’ waifishness.

3 - Persian cat

Ms Kaoru Mori made a point of including a scene with a Persian cat, somehow I doubt that’s accidental.

4 - Persian garden

Just going to link to wikipedia.

Additionally, Rumi and Hafez are two famous Persian poets. Quoting Hafez particularly used to be common in Persia, and may be the source of the poem Anis’ husband says at the end. I did a quick search but didn’t find anything yet. I imagine a poem that started in Persian, was translated to Japanese and then back into English might be a little difficult to identify.

Hypothesis 2 - A pattern of brides

It seems Ms Kaoru Mori is developing a pattern of bride stories. First, we have Amira, who has a fairly happy marriage, if not a unique one.

Then we meet Talas, who came from an incredibly wealthy family (her sa’wkele headdress would have cost a fortune), but misfortune seems to be her constant companion. We never know the names or faces of her husbands. As a woman of wealth, she would have married into an equally wealthy family, but sheep that represented that wealth are gone. She is lonely, and unhappy. 

After that, we meet Layla and Leyli, who again are distinct, but are set up for a happy marriage. I’ve just read about marriage customs in northern India, and bride prices could be negotiated to be lower if there were sisters marrying brothers. Money is indicated to be somewhat of an issue, so we know that the twins and their husbands are not especially wealthy.

Then we have Anis, who lives in a huge mansion (apparently without many servants?), she is supposed to have the perfect life for a woman of that time and country. She is the only wife, she has born her nameless, faceless husband a son, she lives in luxury and idleness, and yet she is clearly very lonely and unhappy.

Both Talas and Anis live in isolation. Talas had the empty steppes to emphasize her isolation, and Anis has the vast and stark hallways of her home to emphasize hers. In truth, Every inch of the house should be covered in decoration. But that would be difficult to depict in black and white, and contradict the message of loneliness.

After Anis, there will probably be a story about Pariya’s wedding. We’ve been introduced to her possible fiancé, so we already know he won’t be nameless and faceless.

Just very interesting to me. A subtle message that wealth does not guarantee happiness, but rather a “bride’s heart” for her groom.

@1 month ago with 20 notes
#otoyomegatari #a bride's story #mori kaoru #kaoru mori #speculation theater #anis #amira halgal 
suzani:

Uzbek old traditional cape dress with face veil, Central Asia. Ethnic textiles.

Photograph originally taken by Rosemary Sheel. The woman is wearing an Uzbek paranja with a veil is made of horsehair. The trim is probably tablet woven, a style of weaving that allows for complex patterns over narrow bands. Because the the photo was taken at a silk factory, I would assume the paranja is made of silk. Paranja were originally a robe worn over the head, but as they become garments designated for the purpose, the sleeves become narrower and longer, eventually becoming completely useless for actually putting arms through. Women in cities were most likely to wear a paranja and veil, since Muslim customs were less strictly practiced in villages, rural areas, and by nomads. 
Talas is seen wearing one in her introductory chapter.

suzani:

Uzbek old traditional cape dress with face veil, Central Asia. Ethnic textiles.

Photograph originally taken by Rosemary Sheel. The woman is wearing an Uzbek paranja with a veil is made of horsehair. The trim is probably tablet woven, a style of weaving that allows for complex patterns over narrow bands. Because the the photo was taken at a silk factory, I would assume the paranja is made of silk. Paranja were originally a robe worn over the head, but as they become garments designated for the purpose, the sleeves become narrower and longer, eventually becoming completely useless for actually putting arms through. Women in cities were most likely to wear a paranja and veil, since Muslim customs were less strictly practiced in villages, rural areas, and by nomads.

Talas is seen wearing one in her introductory chapter.

(Source: pinterest.com)

@1 month ago with 58 notes
#uzbek #paranja 
everythingturkic:

(x)
@1 month ago with 52 notes
uzbechkad:

❤O’zbegimning qizlari hammadan go’zal!❤

uzbechkad:

❤O’zbegimning qizlari hammadan go’zal!❤

(via dokhtare-samarqandi)

@1 month ago with 32 notes
#uzbek #traditional clothing 

universalbeauty:

Turkic People

 What do these people in the photos all have in common? They are Turkic. They all share some linguistic and cultural and even genetic similarities.

 It is believed that the first Turkic people inhabited around Central Asia, China and Siberia. They are believed to have had strong mongoloid features. It is believed they branched off from the Xiongnu people of ancient China. The first widely known Turkic ethnic group where the Gokturks who established the Gokturk empire in the 6th century.

 Turkic people originally had their own writing systems such as Orkhon, Yenisey and then later Uyghur (which was also used in Mongolia until the USSR introduced Russian Cyrillic.)
 Over the course of many years and various empires and dynasties, Turkic people migrated to new places and integrated with other ethnic groups, mixing with the locals creating forming new groups of Turkic speaking people. As a result there are now significant populations of Turkic people in North, east and central Asia and also Eastern Europe. 

(via dokhtare-samarqandi)

@1 month ago with 662 notes